Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Building Better Managers In Your Organization

Have any doubt about the bottom-line connection that your managers have to the bottom-line? When employees leave organizations they most often depart because of how they felt they were managed and the quality of the relationship with their own manager.

A recent and extensive internal study at Google discovered what their employees valued most:
"Even-keeled bosses who made time for one-on-one meetings, who asked good questions to help employees puzzle through tough problems and who took an interest in employees' lives and careers."

The study, described recently in the New York Times, was highlighted by the identification of eight behaviors or habits of highly effective managers there, the so-called "Google Rules." In order of importance they are:
1. Be a good coach.
2. Empower your team and don't micro-manage.
3. Express interest in your team members' success and personal well-being.
4. Get serious: be productive and results oriented.
5. Be a good communicator and listen to your team.
6. Help your employees with career development.
7. Have a clear vision and strategy for the team.
8. Have key technical skills so you can advise the team.

We believe that effective managers are the key to organizational productivity. Google's research reminds us that managers are the glue. Your employees, in effect, see the organization through their experience with their direct boss. Good managers not only get results, they keep your best employees with the organization.

The Greenshoe Group can help you "build better managers" in your organization. We consult to and train managers, ensuring that they have the skills, competencies and confidence they need to get the best results for your organization.

For the link to the complete article and details of the 8 "Google Rules"

For more about The Greenshoe Group visit

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Mission Statements

Mission statements, as we have come to know them, have become, in many cases as boring and lackluster as the back of the new pennies (bring back the Lincoln Memorial!)  We were provoked (thoughtfully) by Dan Pallotta’s iconoclastic and dead-on comments about mission statements. For example,
“Don't put mission statements first. Get on a mission, and the other things will follow. Including the mission statement.”…
“Don't waste your advertising space on your mission statement. Use the space to tell people what you've accomplished, or what amazing thing your product will do — use it to show them what mission you're actually on."

According to Pallotta, mission statements must be about passion and soul.

What’s your take on mission statements? Got any good stories or examples?

His idea of a good mission statement?

You’ll find it here: